I think this is the core of religion as a moral code. So much of what is said about any religion loses the central fact that faith of any kind should put you on the path of becoming a better person. It should be the quite voice in your ear giving you the courage of your conviction when the road is rocky.

It’s easy for any of us to talk about our morality or faith when we’re not being called on to make difficult decisions, but when your self-interest is at stake, do you act like a moral person? That’s the real test of any person.

I’m not a Christian anymore. I gave up that label years ago, but I still have a deep belief in our moral agency and responsibilities.

I just had an employee call me to tell me they had an offer at another company. She was conflicted. She knew that we’d talked about some growth opportunities recently and wanted to explore the possibilities before she decided on what to do.

Firstly, as her boss, I was touched that she trusted me enough to call and have an honest conversation. She wasn’t trying to put me over a barrel. I’d earned her trust in a thousand conversations and here was a vulnerable person having a difficult conversation because she trusted me.

So my decision as a moral agent was to either be supportive, even if that meant losing a good employee in a busy time for our company, or to get angry or feel betrayed. I make a promise to all my employees that my responsibility is to help them grow professionally and personally, even if that means them leaving the team someday. So in the moment of truth, a voice whispers in my ear saying “Remember the promise you made. Remember who you said you were going to be.”

That test, when it comes, is difficult, but as your story shows, can make the difference between becoming a positive force in the world or just another disruption.

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